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Where in the World did I put That

Day 1

Where In The World Did I Put That? Day 4

Learning Objective: Students will become aware of the kinds of things they might need to label/adapt.

Materials Needed: Bump-Ons, Dymo Tape, Puffy Paint, folders

Activity: Have you ever thought: “I’ll remember what this feels/looks like. I’m sure I’ll remember what it is.” Sometimes it works out well, and you actually do remember and can find that certain thing when you need it again, but more often it doesn’t, and you can’t!

It is important for everyone to stay organized and know what they have, and where it is. However, it is even more important for us, as blind/VI people, to have some good ways to help us keep track of things. If you get into the habit of putting things in the same place while you are young, and learn to label personal items and/or assignments in some way (or organize them in a way that makes sense for you),

you’ll save yourself from a lot of worry and anxious moments in the future.

Today we will look at the items in our Learning Kit, and discuss some of the ways they can be used.

Here are some things you might need to mark in some way so you’ll know what they are for sure, be able to find at a moment’s notice, or be able to use.

For locating more easily: assignments, folders, receipts (for when you get older, or if you need to exchange something you’ve bought), Culvers tokens and scoops, gift cards … to name a few.

For Identification: Food items, toiletries, medicines (when you get older), art supplies, certain colors (of beads, Legos, thread, clothes, paper, etc.).

For being able to operate/use: Games, your TV remote, the microwave/washer/dryer/stove in your home.

I am sure you can think of other things that you might want to have a quick and easy way to identify, or be able to adapt so you can use them. Throughout this week we’ll discuss some ways you can do this, using various categories.

Day 2

Where In The World Did I Put That? Day 2

Learning Objective: Students will learn ways to stay organized, and make materials easy to recognize.

Materials Needed: Folders, writer/slate and stylus, label paper, Dymo tape, puffy paint.

Activity: Probably one of the best motivators, to make it easy for you to find items, is school. This is one place you don’t want to feel pressure from teachers waiting for you to hand in your assignment, or classmates who might wonder why you can’t keep track of your things.

Today we’re going to discuss some ways to be organized, and have what we need “at our fingertips,” in the area of school supplies/assignments.

First, let’s think about folders. Sometimes you can buy folders that have different textures. This is an easy way to tell which folder is for math, which is for science, etc. If it is a pocket folder, you might want to think something as simple as papers on the right go right back to school, papers on the left can be left at home, or you might want to label them. Whatever you decide on, stick to it so it becomes natural for you. If you can tell colors at all, this obviously can also be a helpful way to organize your classes.

If your folders all feel the same, and you can’t see color, you will want to do something to make them recognizable to you. This could be something like putting a particular sticker on each one, using some puffy paint to make a design, or making a braille label. We’ll try these things in a few minutes.

When you finish an assignment which is in print, you’ll want to label it somehow. This could be as simple as using a small piece of paper—on which you’ll write something in braille to let you know what the assignment is--and a paper clip to attach the label to the paper. In this case we definitely don’t want to use a sticker, bump-dots, or puffy paint.

When you are confident in using the slate and stylus, you might want to write something on a print paper that a teacher gives you. If you don’t do this, you should have a folder that you put these kinds of papers in—separate from your class folders—so you can keep track of them and make sure to look at them when you get home.

These are a few things you can try to do to be organized. Getting in the habit of using these methods is a good idea. The more organized you are, the more confident you will become, and the more confident you become, the more people will believe in your ability. This will definitely pay off down the road, when you are looking for a job.

Now, let’s spend the rest of the time using our Learning Kit tools to do some labeling.

Day 3

Where In The World Did I Put That? Day 1

Learning Objective: Students will learn some ways of labeling food items and clothing.

Materials Needed: Writer/Slate and Stylus, labeling paper, Dymo Tape

Activity: Have you ever thought you were opening canned fruit only to realize its Spaghettios? This is not a happy surprise, especially if you were putting the fruit in jello. Hopefully you smelled it first! IF you don’t learn to label/organize your food, this will most certainly happen to you at some time in the future.

Food: There are various ways to label foods. If you always use the same kind of cereal, you might want to write its name on a file card, and stick it inside the box. Then, each time you get a new box, you can just put the card in it, and you’re ready to go. It is also easier, since you only have to make the card once. Another idea is to tape the card (or another kind of label) on the outside of the box, and simply open the new box and put the bag into the labeled box before you open the cereal. Some people also use plastic containers that they label first, and then pour the cereal (or whatever item it is) into. There are containers of all shapes and sizes that you can buy, so you can do this with many kinds of food.

Spice bottles—or the metal cans some of them come in--can be labeled in braille, and refilled. If you have cartons of cans--such as soda--you can label the carton so you know what you are getting. For cans of soup, fruits, etc., you can buy magnetic tape which you can put a label on. I really should have had some of this put in your Learning Kit, but you can buy it at hardware or craft stores. IF you make a label using dymo tape, you can put it on the magnetic tape, and put the tape on the can. This is good for two reasons. The first is that it helps you identify which can you are going to open. The other is that—when you empty a can—you can put the magnetic tape on the refrigerator to help you remember to buy more of it when you write your grocery list.

Frozen items are more difficult to keep a label on. A card, with braille written on it, can be stapled around a rubber band, and the rubber band can be put around the items you are labeling.

Now that we’ve gone over these ways of labeling, can you think of other things you’d like to learn to label? I am sure there are foods you especially like. Let’s spend the rest of this class making some labels for these, that you can put on items after class.

Day 4

Where In The World Did I Put That? Day 5

Learning Objective: Students will learn some ways of labeling food items and clothing.

Materials Needed: Writer/Slate and Stylus, labeling paper, Dymo Tape

Activity: Have you ever thought you were opening canned fruit only to realize its Spaghettios? This is not a happy surprise, especially if you were putting the fruit in jello. Hopefully you smelled it first! IF you don’t learn to label/organize your food, this will most certainly happen to you at some time in the future.

Food: There are various ways to label foods. If you always use the same kind of cereal, you might want to write its name on a file card, and stick it inside the box. Then, each time you get a new box, you can just put the card in it, and you’re ready to go. It is also easier, since you only have to make the card once. Another idea is to tape the card (or another kind of label) on the outside of the box, and simply open the new box and put the bag into the labeled box before you open the cereal. Some people also use plastic containers that they label first, and then pour the cereal (or whatever item it is) into. There are containers of all shapes and sizes that you can buy, so you can do this with many kinds of food.

Spice bottles—or the metal cans some of them come in--can be labeled in braille, and refilled. If you have cartons of cans--such as soda--you can label the carton so you know what you are getting. For cans of soup, fruits, etc., you can buy magnetic tape which you can put a label on. I really should have had some of this put in your Learning Kit, but you can buy it at hardware or craft stores. IF you make a label using dymo tape, you can put it on the magnetic tape, and put the tape on the can. This is good for two reasons. The first is that it helps you identify which can you are going to open. The other is that—when you empty a can—you can put the magnetic tape on the refrigerator to help you remember to buy more of it when you write your grocery list.

Frozen items are more difficult to keep a label on. A card, with braille written on it, can be stapled around a rubber band, and the rubber band can be put around the items you are labeling.

Now that we’ve gone over these ways of labeling, can you think of other things you’d like to learn to label? I am sure there are foods you especially like. Let’s spend the rest of this class making some labels for these, that you can put on items after class.

Day 5

Where In The World Did I Put That? Day 3

Learning Objective: Students will learn some ways of labeling food items and clothing.

Materials Needed: Writer/Slate and Stylus, labeling paper, Dymo Tape

Activity: Have you ever thought you were opening canned fruit only to realize it’s Spaghettios? This is not a happy surprise, especially if you were putting the fruit in Jello. Hopefully you smelled it first! If you don’t learn to label/organize your food, this will most certainly happen to you at some time in the future.

Food: There are various ways to label foods. If you always use the same kind of cereal, you might want to write its name on a file card, and stick it inside the box. Then, each time you get a new box, you can just put the card in it, and you’re ready to go. It is also easier, since you only have to make the card once. Another idea is to tape the card (or another kind of label) on the outside of the box, and simply open the new box and put the bag into the labeled box before you open the cereal. Some people also use plastic containers that they label first, and then pour the cereal (or whatever item it is) into it. There are containers of all shapes and sizes that you can buy, so you can do this with many kinds of food.

Spice bottles—or the metal cans some of them come in--can be labeled in braille, and refilled. If you have cartons of cans--such as soda--you can label the carton so you know what you are getting. For cans of soup, fruits, etc., you can buy magnetic tape which you can put a label on. I really should have had some of this put in your Learning Kit, but you can buy it at hardware or craft stores. IF you make a label using Dymo tape, you can put it on the magnetic tape, and put the tape on the can. This is good for two reasons. The first is that it helps you identify which can you are going to open. The other is that—when you empty a can—you can put the magnetic tape on the refrigerator to help you remember to buy more of it when you write your grocery list.

Frozen items are more difficult to keep a label on. A card, with braille written on it, can be stapled around a rubber band, and the rubber band can be put around the items you are labeling.

Now that we’ve gone over these ways of labeling, can you think of other things you’d like to learn to label? I am sure there are foods you especially like. Let’s spend the rest of this class making some labels for these, that you can put on items after class.